US moves nuclear weapons from Turkey to Romania

Two independent sources told EurActiv.com that the US has started transferring nuclear weapons stationed in Turkey to Romania, against the background of worsening relations between Washington and Ankara.

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Turkey Coup Aftermath

Reports Turkish troops have sealed off Incirlik US/NATO nuclear air base

Suspected Leader of Turkish Coup Attempt under arrest

33, including central governors, detained in failed coup attempt probe

9 Suspected of Raiding Erdogan Hotel Captured

Erdogan is taking full control of the military himself

Fethullah Gulen on ‘GPS’: Failed Turkey coup looked ‘like a Hollywood movie’

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A US base in Northern Syria | Colonel Cassad

The American base in the area of Kobani (Syrian Kurdistan). Satellite photos:

https://www.terraserver.com/view?utf8=%E2%9C%93&search_text=&searchLat=&searchLng=&lat=36.54&lng=38.58&bbox=&center=

(the link allows you to see how this place looked before the war) marked 3 helicopter and 2 of the heliplane. Base plays an important role in JSOC operations in Northern Syria. Of course, from the point of view of international law, its presence on the territory of Syria is illegal, but when has international law stopped anyone?

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Turkey’s Nukes: A Sum of All Fears

The national security priesthood in Washington has always used claims of superior wisdom and insider knowledge to silence dissent about nuclear policy. But not even they can explain any longer why U.S. nuclear bombs are being stored in politically unstable Turkey as it grows increasingly Islamist and anti-American.

The Incirlik air base in southeast Turkey — from which U.S. pilots launch bombing raids on ISIS forces in Syria — is home to about 50 B-61 hydrogen bombs. That makes it NATO’s largest nuclear storage facility, with about a quarter of all theater nuclear weapons in the alliance’s stockpiles.

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The H-Bombs in Turkey

According to Hans M. Kristensen, the director of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists, underground vaults at Incirlik hold about fifty B-61 hydrogen bombs—more than twenty-five per cent of the nuclear weapons in the NATO stockpile. The nuclear yield of the B-61 can be adjusted to suit a particular mission. The bomb that destroyed Hiroshima had an explosive force equivalent to about fifteen kilotons of TNT. In comparison, the “dial-a-yield” of the B-61 bombs at Incirlik can be adjusted from 0.3 kilotons to as many as a hundred and seventy kilotons.

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